FAQs - Yoga and Breathing

Frequently Asked Questions about Transformational Breath® and Yoga

Breathing: FAQ

Answers

  • Is Breathing or Breathwork safe?
    In general, breathing is the safest activity in the world. Think for a moment ... How safe is it NOT to breathe? There are advanced breathing techniques which require instruction and care, but TB is safe -- for all intents and purposes there are NO contraindications. During facilitated sessions, you are guided by experienced Breathworkers who make your comfort and safety their highest priority. You ARE required to notify a practitioner of any medical issues which you may have or had -- just as you would your doctor or massage therapist. When you practice our breathing techniques on your own, proceed at your own speed. You will know intuitively, how much is too much. Our mantra: It is Safe to Breathe!! Note: Don't attempt our techniques while driving or operating machinery :-)
    Top Of Breathing FAQ
  • How is Transformational Breath different?
    TB is a complete healing system. We use full circular breathing techniques and combine it with a host of other tools which allow us to move energy and initiate a shift to higher consciousness and healing. Also, we work so much at the Spiritual level; this assures healing at the root of the problem. And we place the greatest emphasis on the flow of the breath. There are a number of breathwork modalities about, but nothing compares to Transformational Breath. But don't believe words, believe your own experience and try it.
    Top Of Breathing FAQ
  • Why should I learn to breathe better?
    There are myriad benefits to developing a conscious breathing practice. These benefits do not end at the Physical. Clearing Emotional detritus, enhancing Mental capabilities, accessing a more Spiritual part of yourself, cultivating greater awareness of the Breath and Self, and opening up any or every aspect of your life are added bonuses. Can you think of any reasons NOT to breathe more optimally?
    Top Of Breathing FAQ
  • What can I expect from a Transformational Breath session?
    There is no set, predictable experience -- during or after. Since you are wholly unique, your experience will also be unique. We do note common patterns such as tingling in the hands, temporary dry mouth, the appearance of buried emotion, feelings of joy or the "Love Buzz", mystical adventures etc. The journey may be at times uncomfortable due to the emotional content but it is paradoxically blissful at the same time. In an altered state of consciousness, One's Higher Self guides the healing, gives you only what you need and provides a feeling of absolute safety. You will leave in a higher vibration, a higher consciousness. We do, however, recommend that you leave expectations and judgments aside and accept whatever part of you arises to heal. Every session is perfect.
    Top Of Breathing FAQ
  • Spiritual Healing? Do I need to have certain religious beliefs?
    No, you need not have any specific beliefs, religious or otherwise, to breathe with us -- Your beliefs are your business. We stay away from preaching, we have NO Dogma. We ask only that you carry an open mind to the Workshop because this work will almost certainly have you challenging your belief system. In the final analysis, your beliefs will be formed and re-formed by your life experiences and the insights you glean from any spiritual practice.
    Top Of Breathing FAQ
  • How much healing is possible with TB?
    We have found from our experience that healing miracles occur constantly. To list a set of "diseases" or "conditions" treatable or curable by one's breathing practice is both limiting and unethical. We make no healing claims: (1) Everyone's healing power is as unique as the individual, (2) You are the Healer, not us. You are responsible for doing the work and believing in your own healing potential, (3) There are no limits to the Power of the Breath. Dr. Kravitz had healed herself of cancer through the application of conscious breathing techniques. Steve had removed a life-threatening food allergy and troublesome digestive disorders. But the healing extends beyond the physical. We have seen miracles occur emotionally, mentally and beyond. People transform, dramatically and permanently, on many levels even after one session -- and it only gets better with practice. So, how much healing is possible? Throw away your measuring stick along with your expectations and come find out.
    Top Of Breathing FAQ
  • What do I bring to a session?
    To prepare for your session with us, we suggest the following: 1) Bring Blankets and Pillows for comfort, as many as you may need, 2) Wear loose, comfortable clothing, 3) Eat only lightly before, 4) Bring an open mind, and, 5) Experienced Breathers please bring a journal to record after-session thoughts.
    Top Of Breathing FAQ

Top

Yoga: FAQ

Answers

  • What does Yoga mean?
    This is a deceptively complex question to answer. Let's take one simple perspective. The Sanskrit term Yoga means "to yoke" or "to harness". These verbs refer to the ancient realization of our multiple dimensions -- the physical, the emotional, the mental and the spiritual; and the ancient art and science of yoga to integrate or fully combine these fragmented aspects of ourselves. Yoga is essentially one's spiritual discipline, equivalent to Christian mysticism, Hebrew Kaballah or Muslim Sufiism. Today we refer often to Hatha yoga or the classical yoga of Patanjali. A more thorough examination of "what is yoga" can be found in some suggested reading.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • What are the benefits of doing yoga?
    Without making medical claims we can state numerous benefits of the many Hatha styles and derivatives. Realistically on the physical level, there is a benefit of more energy, stress reduction, building of strength, (especially "core conditioning"), flexibility and balance. Also, clearer thinking, emotional transformation, and in a true yoga study, spiritual advancement and transcendence of suffering. Yoga is a comprehensive science for health and wellness and whatever you wish to create in life, yoga practice can cultivate such change.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • Why are there so many styles of yoga?
    The simple answer is because there are so many of us who practice yoga. Everyone's path to the divine, everyone's road to healing, everyone's journey through life is as unique as you are, so different teachers over the ages and (certainly in this wild age of Marketing) have seen fit to modify a standard yoga practice to fit themselves and relate it to students. There are different yoga philosophies, some more rigid, others more free, some orthodox, others more radical. Any accounting of the evolution of yoga traditions or styles will be exhaustive and complicated. And with all the current trademarked yoga styles, it can become bewildering to sort through them or find which is right for you. The yoga of the West is typically a modern streamlined version of Hatha styles although we do see the Kundalini and Tantra traditions and Tibetan contributions; all of these stem from the classical yoga of Patanjali. After almost two thousand years evolution of this yoga is natural and necessary. Essentially everyone who practices yoga, or takes a class is recreating yoga -- Your Yoga. It is my job to help that customized path develop.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • Is Meditation part of yoga?
    Meditation classes have sprung up around us either as part of a yoga practice or as a stand-alone discipline. Meditation is part of the Ashtanga -- the eight-limbed approach formulated by Patanjali, which includes among other limbs, the asanas (postures), and pranayama (the breathing exercise or practice of "energy control"). Meditation is called Dhyana in Sanskrit. I include a meditation period at the end of each class as do most styles of yoga. Put simply meditation practice (combined with a relaxed focus on breathing) facilitates a stillness of mind allowing us to see "deeper". There are numerous forms of meditation, both within yoga and various religious traditions; I tend to employ guided meditations and visualizations but also encourage a silent and solitary practice at home. Much has been written on meditation. See the Reading List below for more.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • Do you need to do it every day?
    Well, honestly, yes. If you become a desk-jockey 9 to 5 and a couch potato most of the remaining hours of the day, then you cannot and will not reach deeper meaning or achieve any significant benefit. Approach a yoga practice as you would any other. If you get the energy to work the treadmill on Saturday but remain dormant the rest of the week then you are short-changing yourself. Now everyone, including me, has lapses in practice for myriad reasons. When this happens, examine your reasons and excuses and reaffirm your dedication to the practice.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • Why is Breathing such a big deal in your classes?
    I'll say it again: BREATH is KING! It is the central element to the physical aspects of my yoga practice. Ancient Yogis knew millennia ago that the Breath is the primary vehicle for establishing that connection or "yoking" of the self (lower case) with the Self. Whereas most yoga classes are a physical display of asanas (postures) linked into Vinyasa (flows) with merely a discrete almost obligatory inclusion of breathing, I seek to turn that approach upside down and make Breathing primary while any static postures and all dynamic movement become subordinate. I teach students to pay more attention to how they breath than to how they move. Why? Because when we are aware of the breath during our physical practice, we are "present" -- in the moment. If we toss out, even momentarily, a focus on breathing, we can have our mind wander, leading to such things as injury at worse or an uninspiring lackadaisical practice at best. So such a concentration upon the fully integrated breathing techniques I teach (which are not all mainstream), will carry over to an habitual change in consciousness of what I call "Breath Awareness". When Breath is King such consciousness shifts happens sooner and more positively.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • Do I have to change my religious beliefs or convert somehow?
    NO! Yoga is an art and science as I stated. It is also a philosophy and a spiritual path, and though it sprung from the ancient Vedic Hindu culture, it is NOT a religion. As far as beliefs go, the main spiritual foundation of yoga fits in nicely with existing religions. It is a wonderful compliment to your current spiritual practice or religious faith. In the world of Buddhists, Sikhs, and Jains various forms of yoga have been integrated into those paths for many hundreds of years. For the Christian, Jew or Muslim, yoga can work for you too if you do the work. Any religion, pagan practice or atheism can adopt Yoga because it is a universal science. Using the tools does not require changing your current belief structure at all, but do realize that as you deepen practice you may end up challenging parts of your understanding. This leads to personal growth and is a wonderful thing.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • What do you think about the way Yoga is taught in the West?
    There's two sides to that question. In the West, I find that most local yoga instruction is cookie-cutter. Teachers are churned out without adequate training and their classes become diluted. Ignorance or avoidance of the power of the Breath are common as is a lack of deeper meaning and understanding. I try to teach Yoga in a more comprehensive manner and with greater depth; respecting the classical traditions while helping humbly in its evolution and at least partial restoration. The other side of this question is that in the US and Europe, there are also traditional Ashrams where Yoga is taught much as it was practiced in the East before we in the West ever heard of the term. So Western yoga runs the spectrum regarding adherence to tradition and purity of practice. However, the greater part of yoga has been stripped and dulled to make it more palatable to a Western baby-boomer instant-gratification audience interested mainly in fitness.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ
  • What do you think of Pilates?
    There's certainly nothing wrong with it as it is a very good program for conditioning. It does stop there and so is a limited practice. I do find it ironic that when you take away the mechanical apparatus developed by Joseph Pilates, you have exercises that are basically modified yoga. But even so, if I prefer a Pilates element to a related Yoga movement I will integrate (or re-integrate) it into my yoga style and teach it accordingly. There's that word Inter-disciplinary again.
    Top Of Yoga FAQ

Top